Appel à contribution – Table ronde « Pictorial Hagiography: East and West », Congrès international, Kalamazoo, 2020

Appel à contribution
PICTORIAL HAGIOGRAPHY : EAST AND WEST

Organizers : Nicolas Varaine (École Pratique des Hautes Études / Institut national d’histoire de l’art)
and Elizabeth Zanghi (Sorbonne Université)

Artistic representations of the deeds of the ‘very special dead’ are a hagiographical genre as old as written vitae, and enjoyed tremendous popularity throughout the Middle Ages. The visual vitae of the saints can be found on various media, from jewellery to monumental painting, and were an integral part of a cult whose forms varied from the intimacy of personal devotion to the public ceremonies of civic or royal cult.Saints have rarely been studied in a broad geographic and religious perspective in spite of many shared or parallel cults between the Latin West and the Byzantine East.Comparative approaches have also been rather limited.

This session aims to bring together art historians of the medieval West and
Byzantium in order to create a cross-cultural dialogue concerning pictorial
hagiography encompassing a variety of media. An art historical perspective will be used to explore the construction, messages and functions of these multifaceted visual narratives within the social and religious contexts of their time. The analysis of the visual language through which these stories are constituted will foster questions concerning the role of this material, long neglected in hagiographic studies, in the construction of saintly identities and the place of saints in the memories and devotional practices of both individuals and communities.

Pour plus de détails, cliquez ici.

 

To submit a paper proposal, please email Nicolas Varaine (nicolas.varaine@inha.fr) and Elizabeth Zanghi (elizabethpalmazanghi@gmail.com) by September 8, 2019.

Offre d’emploi – Assistant Professor of Medieval or Early Modern Mediterranean History (Kalamazoo College)

Offre d’emploi

Assistant Professor of Medieval or Early Modern Mediterranean History (Kalamazoo College)

 

The Department of History at Kalamazoo College invites applications for a tenure-track position as assistant professor of Medieval or Early Modern Mediterranean history, to begin in September 2018. As the sole member of the department responsible for this period, the successful candidate will be expected to offer introductory and upper-division undergraduate courses on the Mediterranean, Europe, and the Islamic world or Colonial Latin America. These classes should reflect their specific expertise and the broader geographic and conceptual scope of the field. We also seek applicants willing and able to help reimagine the department’s current curriculum. We are especially interested in transnational approaches to Mediterranean history focusing on issues such as (but not limited to) ethnicity, migration, majority/minority relations, gender, and the interaction between the different religious and imperial entities of the region. The successful applicant will also teach within the College’s Shared Passages Program of first-year and sophomore seminars and senior capstone courses. The teaching load is six courses per year on a quarter system (2/2/2), with additional duties including directing senior theses and academic advising.

Ph.D. or evidence of imminent completion is required. Salary is competitive and commensurate with experience. The successful candidate will have demonstrated a high aptitude for and interest in undergraduate teaching, a commitment to the liberal arts, and a promise of scholarly excellence.

Kalamazoo College is a highly selective nationally known liberal arts college offering an integrated undergraduate experience that weaves a traditional liberal arts curriculum into educational experiences in both domestic and international settings. The campus is located midway between Chicago and Detroit in Kalamazoo, Michigan, a metropolitan community of 225,000 that supports several college and university campuses along with numerous civic arts and cultural associations.

Completed applications received by October 16, 2017 will receive full consideration, with later applications reviewed as needed until the position is filled. Upload cover letter, CV, detailed statement of teaching philosophy and goals, description of scholarly interests, statement on experience working with underrepresented students and engaging issues of diversity and inclusion in the curriculum and pedagogical approaches, and undergraduate and graduate transcripts (unofficial acceptable) in PDF format below. Please have three confidential letters of recommendation sent in PDF format to HistorySearch@kzoo.edu with a subject line in the format lastname_firstname. Please send all inquiries to Dr. Joseph J. Bangura, Chair of the Search Committee.

Kalamazoo College encourages candidates who will contribute to the cultural diversity of the College to apply and to identify themselves if they wish. Equal Opportunity Employer.

To apply: http://www.kzoo.edu/search/index.php?dept=history/

Appel à contribution – Presbyters in the Late Antique West (International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo)

Behind the bishop’s back

Presbyters, deacons, and the lower clergy in Late Antiquity

At the forthcoming International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo (10-13 May 2018) the Presbyters in the Late Antique West project is organising a session on the role of the lower and middle clergy in the ecclesiastical and social life of the late antique West. In spite of the continuous development of studies on the religious history of Late Antiquity, the research on the development and function of clergy seems surprisingly underdeveloped and the scholarly interest in this group has been hitherto focused mostly on bishops (Rapp 2005). This, of course, is understandable. The impact of bishops on ecclesiastical politics, doctrine, and Christian literature was more important than that of the lower echelons of the clergy. Moreover, bishops are much better represented in the evidence. But by the end of the 7th century in several parts of Christendom, the bishop had become a rather distant figure and most people could have been in day-to-day contact only with presbyters, deacons, and lower clerics, who were the rank and file of the Church hierarchy. A trail of research on these people has been already blazed by scholars focusing on specific regions of the Christian world (Wipszycka 1972 and 1996, Rebillard/Sotinel 1998, Godding 2001, Hübner 2005, Patzold/van Rhijn 2016). A number of questions, however, remain unanswered or even unasked. Thus far, we can say very little with a sufficient degree of certainty on the position of clerics in the local community, their social background, property and sources of income, their lodgings, professional (and non-ecclesiastical) activities, the connections between them and the rest of society and the barriers which set them apart from other people. Even their functions in liturgy remain obscure. The estimations of their number are largely intuitive, and their role is often judged on the basis of well-known, but fairly untypical examples.

This session will be sponsored by the Presbyters in the Late Antique West project, based at the University of Warsaw (https://projectpresbyters.wordpress.com). It will seek to answer questions concerning the role and activity of clerics in four areas: ecclesiastical, social, economic, and in the field of mentality. We welcome papers dealing with any of the aspects named above in a broad geographical perspective covering all the regions of late antique Christendom in the period until the year 700.

Those interested in presenting paper at this session are requested to send title and short abstract (100 words) to Robert Wiśniewski (r.wisniewski@uw.edu.pl) before 15 September. Please note that the project, sadly, cannot cover conference fee and travel expenses.