Appel à contribution – International Congress of Medieval Studies, Leeds (2-5 July 2018)

Call for papers

International Congress of Medieval Studies, Leeds (2-5 July 2018)

(Deadline 8 September 2017)

We invite scholars at all career stages to submit proposals for twenty-minute papers for special sessions at the International Congress of Medieval Studies in Leeds (2-5 July 2018) connected with the main topics of “Moving Byzantium” Project, with a particular focus on aspects of geographical, social and cultural mobility within and beyond the Byzantine Empire.

Please send paper proposals (300 words max.), in English, accompanied by a short CV including affiliation, career stage and research interests, by 8 September 2017 to Ms. Paraskevi Sykopetritou, Project Coordinator: paraskevi.sykopetritou@univie.ac.at.

Papers will be selected by 15 September 2017 through an anonymous review process by the Moving Byzantium Team, headed by Professor Claudia Rapp.

Your abstract will be evaluated based on: 1) relevance to the topic (« geographical, social and cultural mobility »), 2) new material provided, 3) novel interpretations, and 4) innovative methods used.

Successful candidates (for whom we can offer reimbursement of the registration fee) must confirm their participation by 22 September 2017.

Further information about the Call for Papers can be found here and about the Moving Byzantium Project at http://rapp.univie.ac.at/

Appel à contribution – Remembering and forgetting saints in Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages (IMC, Leeds, 2-5 July 2018)

Call for papers

Remembering and forgetting saints in Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages (IMC, Leeds, 2-5 July 2018)

 

The Cult of Saints is a major ERC-funded research project, which is investigating the origins and early development of the cult of saints in all the cultural zones of ancient Christianity. The forthcoming International Medieval Congress in Leeds (2-5 July 2018) has ‘Memory’ as its special thematic strand. The Project will therefore be running a series of sessions on how saints were remembered in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. As specific topics for these sessions, we have chosen: ‘Adapting Memory’, on how the hagiography of some saints evolved in response to changing circumstances and needs; ‘Annual Remembrance’, focused on the regular annual cycle of remembering the saints, as documented in texts such as Martyrologies; and, finally, ‘Forgetting’, on saints who once attracted cult, but then slipped quietly into oblivion. Those interested in presenting papers at these sessions, particularly if focused on the period before c. AD 1000, are requested to send a short abstract (100 words) to Robert Wiśniewski (r.wisniewski@uw.edu.pl) and Bryan Ward-Perkins (bryan.ward-perkins@history.ox.ac.uk) by 15 September. Please note that the project, sadly, cannot cover conference fee and travel expenses.

Call for papers – Special session (2), Medieval Congress (Leeds, 3-6 July 2017)

Call for papers

Grey-zone saints in Late Antiquity and early Middle Ages

Medieval Congress – Leeds, 3-6 July 2017

The Cult of Saints is a major five-year research project, based at the University of Oxford, which is investigating the origins and development of the cult of saints in all cultural zones of ancient Christianity up to around AD 700. At the forthcoming Medieval Congress in Leeds (3-6 July 2017) the project-team is organising a strand on grey-zone, or marginal, saints in Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages. A limited number of Christian heroes, mostly New Testament figures and martyrs, were renowned across Christendom. Many more struggled hard to gain a wider prominence, or even local recognition, and often remained saints only in the eyes of single partisans or restricted groups. Their sainthood was suggested but not fully accepted, or promoted but contested; their cults almost succeeded, but finally failed. Sometimes their very existence was put into question. Those interested in presenting papers on such saints and their cults, particularly if focused on the period before c.900, are requested to send title and short abstract (c. 100 words) to Bryan Ward-Perkins (bryan.ward-perkins@history.ox.ac.uk) or Robert Wiśniewski (r.wisniewski@uw.edu.pl) by 20 September. Please, note that, sadly, the project is unable to fund speakers expenses.

Call for papers – Special session, Medieval Congress (Leeds, 3-6 July 2017)

Call for papers

Session on the income and property of the clergy

Medieval Congress – Leeds, 3-6 July 2017

 

At the forthcoming Medieval Congress in Leeds (3-6 July 2017) the team of the ‘Presbyters in the Late Antique West’ Project, based at the University of Warsaw, organises a strand on the income and property of clergy. In most literary and normative sources we usally see clerics entirely dependent on diverse types of subsidies related to their ecclesiastical office. But some casual remarks and documentary evidence show that the reality was more complicated. The actual sources of income of clerics were diverse. This session will seek to answer the following questions:

·      How much did the clerics rely on church property and revenues?

·      What were other sources of their income, either those linked with the religious expertise or unconnected with ecclesiastical activity?

·      How the frontiers were fixed between the private property and revenues of clerics and those of the church, but also between the resources of diverse groups of clerics?

Those interested in presenting papers on such topics, particularly if focused on the period before c. 900, are requested to send the title and a short abstract (c. 100 words) to Robert Wiśniewski (r.wisniewski@uw.edu.pl) by 20 September. Please, note that unfortunately the project is unable to fund speakers expenses.